Presentation Notes to my Design to the Powers of Ten UX Futures Talk

Create a one-click expiring link

DeadC.net is a link shortening service with a difference. You can create a URL that can only be clicked upon once.

Of course, it’s only a re-direct, so someone can always copy the redirected URL, but useful for quickly sharing things "without being tracked," as the site says.

In many ways, this is horribly wrong, because it breaks the fundamental principle of avoiding dead links on the Web, but that’s the idea I suppose.

No-rage CSS layout

Learn Layout is a great little site. I can code HTML and CSS, but not brilliantly and I don’t have to do it that often. When I do, I always have to re-cap on the latest developments. This tutorial site is just what I need:

I assume you already know what selectors, properties, and values are. And you probably know a thing or two about layout, though it may still be a rage-provoking activity for you. If you want to learn HTML and CSS from the beginning, you should check out this tutorial. Otherwise, let’s see if we can save you some fury on your next project.

Designers are not researchers: the difference between design and social research

Designers are not researchers: the difference between design and social research from Sam Ladner is worth a read by all designers engaging in this kind of work. I suspect we’re all guilty of it. My excuse would be that sometimes its necessary and useful for designers to do the research, but I’m not sure I would be arguing the point the other way around, that social scientists should do a bit of design.

Without Design Methods, I Feel Like I Am Cheating

Without Design Methods, I Feel Like I Am Cheating – another cracking post from Jon Kolko. This one is close to my heart because I teach design methods on HSLU’s MA Design and always make a point of saying that theory is practice and that methods are simply tools. As Jon says,

a design method won’t lead you to a good solution, because a design method has no natural relationship to the content of the problem. There’s no presumption of quality in the method, as each method is simply a series of artificial constraints that are introduced into a particular design context in order to help frame it.

There is a useful set of links at the end of Jon’s post too.

Falling Light by Troika

Falling Light by Troika is an installation that will be available to view at the V&A;’s British Design exhibition opening on 31st March.

50 ceiling suspended mechanical devices each incorporating a custom cut Swarovski crystal optical lens, a computer programmed motor and a white LED, comprise TROIKA’s installation ‘Falling Light’.

The white-painted metal armatures rise in syncopation by rotating cam before gravity releases them earthward, activating the LED to move away, closer to the crystal lens. The lens acts as a prism, transforming through diffraction, the LED’s white light into a rainbow myriad, in turn creating the rhythmical ebb and flow of the floor-strewn droplets.

I always like how technology plays a part in Troika’s work, but it’s as a medium, not as the content. Words don’t do it justice — Seb describes it best in this video.