Falling Light by Troika

Falling Light by Troika is an installation that will be available to view at the V&A;’s British Design exhibition opening on 31st March.

50 ceiling suspended mechanical devices each incorporating a custom cut Swarovski crystal optical lens, a computer programmed motor and a white LED, comprise TROIKA’s installation ‘Falling Light’.

The white-painted metal armatures rise in syncopation by rotating cam before gravity releases them earthward, activating the LED to move away, closer to the crystal lens. The lens acts as a prism, transforming through diffraction, the LED’s white light into a rainbow myriad, in turn creating the rhythmical ebb and flow of the floor-strewn droplets.

I always like how technology plays a part in Troika’s work, but it’s as a medium, not as the content. Words don’t do it justice — Seb describes it best in this video.

Troika – Digital by Design & Interview

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Troika have a new book out called Digital by Design: Crafting Technology for Products and Environments. It is a wide-ranging survey of works that use new and emerging digital technologies, often crossed with physical interactions and products that blur the boundaries between art and design. They have managed to collect together work from a fantastic range of contributors, including my mates over at Hulger.

I visited Troika a while back and interviewed for a Podcast on Core77 and really like their approach to what they do and they’re lovely people too.

I plan to review Digital by Design for the soon-to-be-launched Designers Review of Books, but in the meantime you can buy it from Amazon.co.uk here (or Amazon.com here).

I also wrote a profile on them in my Foreign Policy column for Desktop. It seemed a fitting time for another “From the Archives” interview post. You can read the full Desktop article after the jump… Continue reading “Troika – Digital by Design & Interview”

Mac Virus with Gravitas

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Troika, the folks behind the cloud sculpture at Heathrow, have created a virus on a USB stick, called the Newton Virus (for manual infection) that makes your desktop fall to pieces. It also uses the tilt sensors in the Macbooks for some gravity fun so you can shake the pieces around.

The piece isn’t design to be malicious. It harks back to the golden days when viruses were there to amuse rather than to destroy:

The virus will then hit at random, but only once. It will not replicate itself, mail itself to your friends or destroy any of your files, but instead provides you with moments of blissful surprise and magic.

See the video on Gizmodo.

I’m going to visit Troika this week to do a podcast for Core77. I’ll see if I can get infected.

(Via NOTCOT).

[tags]Troika, virus, macbook, play, playful[/tags]

Troika is on Cloud, er, Five

If you haven’t already explored the background behind Troika’s cloud for BA’s Terminal 5 – “a five meter long digital sculpture whose surface is covered with 4638 flip-dots that can be individually addressed by a computer to animate the entire skin of the sculpture” – Pixelsumo has got the goods and also images of the Processing pattern mock-up tool.

More development images and info here.

Or just watch the video above and wish you had done it.

[tags]troika, artwork, installation, cloud, processing[/tags]